People, Planet & Peace
The Massachusetts Affiliate of the Green Party of the United States
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Strike Down 'Three Strikes' Bill

Here is a statement issued by the Greater Boston Chapter of the Green-Rainbow Party against the "Three Strikes" bill currently sitting on Gov. Patrick's desk.  After reading this please feel free to contact the Governor and tell him to veto this bill.

"We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion. There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it."
We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion. There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it."
"We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion. There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it."
"We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion. There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it."
"We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion. There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it."
We oppose the 'three strikes' mandatory sentencing bill that was approved by both
houses of the Massachusetts State Legislature this week. We urge governor Patrick
to veto the bill. The new law would force judges to sentence human beings to long
prison terms with no chance of parole. The sentences are cruel and will be unfairly
applied to people of color and to economically disadvantaged persons. The Black
and Latino legislative caucus, in their statement in opposition to the bill, cited
statistics showing that Blacks and Latinos already comprise a majority of the Massachusetts
prison population. A 2004 study by Northeastern University's Institute on Race and
Justice found racial disparities in traffic tickets that indicate widespread racial
profiling practiced by many police departments in Massachusetts. The criminal justice
system in Massachusetts already unfairly targets people of color at every level from
police investigations to prosecutions to sentencing. Application of the new 'three
strikes' policy would devastate communities of color in Massachusetts as persons
who are making a positive contribution to their communities are taken away from their
families and loved ones to be sent to prison. The law would allow no judicial discretion.
There would be no possibility to consider the specific circumstances of a person's
life and of the crime when determining the sentence. Imprisoning a person for a year
costs the Commonwealth close to $50,000. This legislation will result in more prisoners
with longer sentences. Residents of Massachusetts will end up having to pay more
in taxes and government fees to pay for imprisonment, or else other government spending
that actually helps people will have to be cut. The only ones who would benefit
from this law would be the prison industry. Other states are repealing their 'three
strikes' and mandatory sentencing laws to cut prison costs and save hundreds of millions
of dollars. Harsh sentencing does not even reduce crime rates. Statistics show that
between 1993 and 2002 rates of violent crime in the USA decreased by the same amount
in non-'three strikes' states as in 'three strikes' states. The current bill is
a step in the wrong direction. We need to repeal mandatory sentencing, not expand it.

 

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@GR_Party tweeted this page. 2012-07-21 13:08:06 -0400
Green-Rainbow Party posted about Strike Down 'Three Strikes' Bill on Green-Rainbow Party's Facebook page 2012-07-21 13:08:05 -0400
Strike Down 'Three Strikes' Bill
published this page in Equity and Justice Blog 2012-07-21 12:44:03 -0400